SCIENCE 02-01

1 Page LAB REPORT

For each assignment, you will use the M.U.S.E. link to complete the lab.

In this lab, you will see the time progression of industrialization and human development to help you write up a scientific paper that centers on the following:

  • If current human development does not change, will groundwater sustainability be affected?

Human Impacts on the Sustainability of Groundwater

Sustainability is based on a simple principle: Everything that is needed for survival and well-being depends either directly or indirectly on the natural environment. Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, while also helping to fulfill the social and economic requirements of present and future generations.

Using the M.U.S.E. link, review the background information and gather your data.

Use the Lab 1 worksheet for assignment instructions and data collection.

Title: Human Impacts on the Sustainability of Groundwater

Instructions: You will need to write a 1-page lab report using the scientific method to answer the following question:

  • If current human development does not change, will groundwater sustainability be affected?

When your lab report is complete – submit it in the classroom.

Part I: Using the time progression of industrialization and human development, fill in the data table below to help you write up your lab report.

Part II: Write a 1-page lab report using the following scientific method sections:

  • Purpose
    • State the purpose of the lab.
  • Introduction
    • This is an investigation of what is currently known about the question being asked. Use background information from credible references to write a short summary about concepts in the lab. List and cite references in APA style.
  • Hypothesis/Predicted Outcome
    • A hypothesis is an educated guess. Based on what you have learned and written about in the Introduction, state what you expect to be the results of the lab procedures.
  • Methods
    • Summarize the procedures that you used in the lab. The Methods section should also state clearly how data (numbers) were collected during the lab; this will be reported in the Results/Outcome section.
  • Results/Outcome
    • Provide here any results or data that were generated while doing the lab procedure.
  • Discussion/Analysis
    • In this section, state clearly whether you obtained the expected results.  Also discuss the results and what you learned from this lab.
    • Note: You can use the lab data to help you discuss the results and what you learned.

Provide references in APA format. This includes a reference list and in-text citations for references used in the Introduction section.

Give your paper a title and identify each section as specified above. Although the hypothesis will be a 1-sentence answer, the other sections will need to be paragraphs to adequately explain your experiment.

MUSE

Part 1

Background Information

Planet Earth’s surface is over 70% water, but less than 1% of the water on Earth is considered accessible, usable freshwater for sustaining humans’ and other organisms’ lives. Of the accessible freshwater, approximately 99% is located in aquifers, natural underground water chambers, and other groundwater sources. Unfortunately, humans are depleting the aquifers faster than they can be recharged by the hydrological cycle. Therefore, three quarters of groundwater is considered nonrenewable.

Conditions

The main reason we using groundwater resources mainly for drinking and irrigation. As a result, this not only decreases an important source of freshwater—it also can cause pollution of that groundwater by saltwater intrusion. The recharge rate of groundwater is further hindered by land clearing and deforestation caused by human development. When land is cleared for human development, more flooding occurs, the transpiration rate (the amount of water that evaporates into the atmosphere from plants) is reduced, and rainwater is inhibited from adequately percolating (penetrating the soil) into the ground to allow for aquifers and groundwater to be recharged.

Figure below shows Saltwater Intrusion:

(Wright & Boorse, 2010)

Impacts

Forty percent of the world’s food is produced via irrigation. As a result, if the current rate of groundwater usage continues, food production could be drastically reduced worldwide. This reduction in food supply would be detrimental in sustaining the projected worldwide human population of over 10 billion within the next 50 years.

Part 2

Time Line

Use the Hydrologic Cycle Figure below to understand the impact of industrialization and human development on ground water over 3 centuries.

(Wright & Boorse, 2010)

The table below shows the impacts:

Reference

Wright, R. T., & Boorse, D. F. (2010). Environmental science: Toward a sustainable future (11th ed.) White Plains, NY: Addison Wesley.

CONDITIONS

Part 1

Background Information

Planet Earth’s surface is over 70% water, but less than 1% of the water on Earth is considered accessible, usable freshwater for sustaining humans’ and other organisms’ lives. Of the accessible freshwater, approximately 99% is located in aquifers, natural underground water chambers, and other groundwater sources. Unfortunately, humans are depleting the aquifers faster than they can be recharged by the hydrological cycle. Therefore, three quarters of groundwater is considered nonrenewable.

Conditions

The main reason we using groundwater resources mainly for drinking and irrigation. As a result, this not only decreases an important source of freshwater—it also can cause pollution of that groundwater by saltwater intrusion. The recharge rate of groundwater is further hindered by land clearing and deforestation caused by human development. When land is cleared for human development, more flooding occurs, the transpiration rate (the amount of water that evaporates into the atmosphere from plants) is reduced, and rainwater is inhibited from adequately percolating (penetrating the soil) into the ground to allow for aquifers and groundwater to be recharged.

Figure below shows Saltwater Intrusion:

(Wright & Boorse, 2010)

Impacts

Forty percent of the world’s food is produced via irrigation. As a result, if the current rate of groundwater usage continues, food production could be drastically reduced worldwide. This reduction in food supply would be detrimental in sustaining the projected worldwide human population of over 10 billion within the next 50 years.

Part 2

Time Line

Use the Hydrologic Cycle Figure below to understand the impact of industrialization and human development on ground water over 3 centuries.

(Wright & Boorse, 2010)

The table below shows the impacts:

Reference

Wright, R. T., & Boorse, D. F. (2010). Environmental science: Toward a sustainable future (11th ed.) White Plains, NY: Addison Wesley.

IMPACT

Part 1

Background Information

Planet Earth’s surface is over 70% water, but less than 1% of the water on Earth is considered accessible, usable freshwater for sustaining humans’ and other organisms’ lives. Of the accessible freshwater, approximately 99% is located in aquifers, natural underground water chambers, and other groundwater sources. Unfortunately, humans are depleting the aquifers faster than they can be recharged by the hydrological cycle. Therefore, three quarters of groundwater is considered nonrenewable.

Conditions

The main reason we using groundwater resources mainly for drinking and irrigation. As a result, this not only decreases an important source of freshwater—it also can cause pollution of that groundwater by saltwater intrusion. The recharge rate of groundwater is further hindered by land clearing and deforestation caused by human development. When land is cleared for human development, more flooding occurs, the transpiration rate (the amount of water that evaporates into the atmosphere from plants) is reduced, and rainwater is inhibited from adequately percolating (penetrating the soil) into the ground to allow for aquifers and groundwater to be recharged.

Figure below shows Saltwater Intrusion:

(Wright & Boorse, 2010)

Impacts

Forty percent of the world’s food is produced via irrigation. As a result, if the current rate of groundwater usage continues, food production could be drastically reduced worldwide. This reduction in food supply would be detrimental in sustaining the projected worldwide human population of over 10 billion within the next 50 years.

Part 2

Time Line

Use the Hydrologic Cycle Figure below to understand the impact of industrialization and human development on ground water over 3 centuries.

(Wright & Boorse, 2010)

The table below shows the impacts:

Reference

Wright, R. T., & Boorse, D. F. (2010). Environmental science: Toward a sustainable future (11th ed.) White Plains, NY: Addison Wesley.

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